A-Z Further Reading and Viewing

This selective list is to support the online A-Z and includes books, chapters, articles, websites and materials that we hope are widely available and accessible, though some are not open access. We include both general resources as well as specific ones that relate to each A-Z term, for which we include the brief introductory text included in each film. Together, these should give viewers further contextual understanding of the exercises and material presented, more background information on the formative past experiences of and key influences on the trainers (Paul Allain and Frank Camilleri), key examples of their own publications, as well as suggestions for further research and reflection. We have also tried to focus on resources published by Bloomsbury which are available as part of Drama Online.

General

  • Allain, Paul. 1997. Gardzienice: Polish Theatre in Transition (Amsterdam: Overseas Publishers Association).
  • Barba, Eugenio, & Nicola Savarese. 2006. The Secret Art of the Performer: a Dictionary of Theatre Anthropology, sec. ed. (London: Routledge).
  • Callery, Dymphna. 2001. Through the Body: a Practical Guide to Physical Theatre (London: Nick Hern Books).
  • Copeau, Jacques. 1991. Texts on the Theatre (London & New York: Routledge).
  • Evans, Mark. 2015. Actor Training Reader (Oxon & New York: Routledge).
  • Grotowski, Jerzy. 1968. Towards a Poor Theatre (London: Eyre Methuen) Films available: http://www.grotowski.net/mediateka/wideo [accessed 6 June 2017].
  • Hodge, Alison. 2010. Actor Training, sec. ed. (Oxon & New York: Routledge) Films available: http://cw.routledge.com.chain.kent.ac.uk/textbooks/actortraining/ [accessed 6 June 2017].
  • Lindh, Ingemar. 2013. Stepping Stones (Holstebro–Malta–Wrocław: Routledge Icarus).
  • Marshall, Lorna, & Yoshi Oida. 2008. The Body Speaks (London: Methuen Drama).
  • Matthews, John. 2014. Anatomy of Performance Training (London: Methuen)..
  • Matthews, John. 2011. Training for Performance: A Meta-disciplinary Account (London: Methuen).
  • Saint-Denis, Michel. 1982. Training for the Theatre (New York: Theatre Arts Books).
  • Suzuki, Tadashi. 1985. The Way of Acting (New York: Theatre Communications Group).
  • Watson, Ian. 2001. Performer Training: Developments Across Cultures (Oxon & New York: Routledge).
  • Zarrilli, Phillip B. 2003. (ed.) Acting (Re)Considered: a Theoretical and Practical Guide, sec. ed. (London: Routledge).

Acrobatics

DEMONSTRATES THE VALUE OF DOING BASIC ACROBATIC BALANCES, USING THREE EXERCISES: JUMP ONTO THE BACK, THE ‘TITANIC’ LIFT AND HANDSTAND ON THE THIGHS.

  • Allain, Paul. (ed.) 2012. Andrei Droznin’s physical actor training: A Russian masterclass, DVD & booklet (Abingdon: Routledge).
  • Droznin, Andrei. 2017. Physical Actor training: What Shall I do with the Body they Gave Me?, (Oxon & New York: Routledge).
  • Gordon, Mel. 2002. ‘Meyerhold’s Biomechanics’, in Phillip B. Zarrilli. (ed.) Acting (Re)Considered: a Theoretical and Practical Guide, sec. ed. (London: Routledge) pp. 106–128.

Alignment

SHOWS THE TRAINEES EXPLORING HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL PLANES TO LOCATE THE BODY IN SPACE.

  • Laban, Rudolf, & Lisa Ullmann. 2011. The Mastery of Movement (London: Dance Books).
  • Loui, Annie. 2009. ‘Chapters 1–3’ in The Physical Actor (Oxon & New York: Routledge).
  • Todd, Mabel. 2008. The Thinking Body: a Study of the Balancing Forces of Dynamic Man (Gouldsboro, ME: Gestalt Journal Press, Inc.).

Articulation

FOCUSES ON FRAGMENTATION AND ISOLATION OF THE ARMS BEFORE INTRODUCING FLOW. REFERENCE IS MADE TO JERZY GROTOWSKI’S PLASTIQUES.

  • Grotowski, Jerzy. 1968. ‘Actor’s Training (1959–1962)’, ‘Actor’s Training: 1966’, in Towards a Poor Theatre (London: Eyre Methuen) pp. 133–174, and pp. 175–204..
  • Carreri, Roberta. 2014. ‘Chapter 13: Segmentation’, in On Training and Performance: Traces of an Odin Teatret Actress (London: Routledge), pp. 61–66.
  • Cynkutis, Zbigniew. 2015. ‘Chapter 5: Conversations with the Body’, in Acting with Grotowski: theatre as a field for experiencing life (London: Routledge) pp. 98–153.
  • Decroux, Etienne. 1985. Words on Mime (Claremont, CA: Mime Journal).
  • Dennis, Anne. 1995. The Articulate Body: the Physical Training of the Actor (London: Nick Hern Books).

Awareness

USES A 360° SPHERE EXERCISE IN WHICH THE TRAINEES DRAW LINES IN SPACE, INDIVIDUALLY AND THEN IN PAIRS.

  • Loui, Annie. 2009. The Physical Actor (Oxon & New York: Routledge).
  • Oida, Yoshi, & Lorna Marshall. 1997. The Invisible Actor (Oxon & New York: Routledge)..
  • Richards, Thomas. 1997. The Edge-Point of Performance (Documentation Series of The Workcenter of Jerzy Grotowski: Pontedera).
  • Zarrilli, Phillip B. 2009, ‘Chapter 2: Beginning with the Breath’, in Psychophysical Acting: An Intercultural Approach to Stanislavski(London: Routledge), pp. 22–40.

Balance

SHOWS AN INVERTED BALANCE IN PAIRS FOLLOWED BY MOVEMENT SEQUENCES EXPLORING EUGENIO BARBA’S NOTION OF ‘LUXURY BALANCE.

  • Barba, Eugenio. 1995. ‘Chapter 3: Recurring Principles’, in The Paper Canoe: A Guide to Theatre Anthropology (London: Routledge) pp. 13–35.
  • Barba, Eugenio, & Nicola Savarese. 2006. The Secret Art of the Performer: a Dictionary of Theatre Anthropology, sec. ed. (London: Routledge).

Breath

SHOWS HOW BREATHING UNDERPINS TRAINING. IT PROGRESSES FROM INBREATH AND OUTBREATH, THROUGH AN INVITATION TO PARTICIPATE, TO GROUP RHYTHMIC BREATHING BASED ON GARDZIENICE THEATRE ASSOCIATION’S PRACTICE.

  • Allain, Paul. 1997. ‘Chapter 5: Training’, in Gardzienice: Polish Theatre in Transition(Amsterdam: Overseas Publishers Association), pp. 59–78.
  • Boston, Jane, & Rena Cook. (eds). 2009. Breath in Action: the Art of Breath in Vocal and Holistic Practice (London: Jessica Kingsley).
  • Zarrilli, Phillip B. 2009. ‘Chapter 2: Beginning with the Breath’, in Psychophysical Acting: An Intercultural Approach to Stanislavski(London: Routledge), pp. 22–40.

Collapse

BREAKS DOWN A FALLING EXERCISE INTO ITS COMPONENT PARTS, FOCUSING ON THE DYNAMICS OF CONTROL AND RELEASE.

  • Heathfield, Adrian. 2006. ‘After the Fall: Dance-Theatre and Dance-Performance’, in Contemporary Theatres in Europe: A Critical Companion (London: Routledge), pp. 188–98.
  • Wethal, Torgeir (dir.). 1971. Corporeal Mime: Demonstrations by Yves Lebreton. (Holstebro: Odin Teatret Film) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ovSwkUVevE [accessed 6 June 2017].

Contact

EXPLORES DIFFERENT MODES AND QUALITIES OF CONTACT — TACTILE, VISUAL AND KINESTHETIC.

  • Keogh, Martin. 2018. Dancing Deeper Still: The Practice of Contact Improvisation (Intimately Rooted Books: British Columbia).
  • Lundberg, Paul. 1992. The Book of Shiatsu (New York: Gaia Original).
  • Paxton, Steve. 1982. ‘Contact Improvisation’ (Dartington: Dartington Theatre Papers).

Cooldown

SHOWS HOW TRAINEES CAN RELAX AND EASE OUT AT THE END OF A CLASS.

  • Stanislavski, Konstantin. 2013. ‘Chapter 6: Relaxation of Muscles’, in An Actor Prepares, (London: Bloomsbury Academic) pp. 83–96.

Craft

IS A CONVERSATION BETWEEN PAUL AND FRANK ABOUT TECHNIQUE AND ABILITY AS KEY ELEMENTS OF CRAFT IN TRAINING AND PERFORMANCE-MAKING.

  • Barba, Eugenio. 1999. Theatre – Solitude, Craft, Revolt (Aberystwyth: Black Mountain Press).
  • Camilleri, Frank. 2018. ‘Clues on Technē’, Centenary Issue, Performance Research, 23:4..
  • Sennett, Richard. 2009. The Craftsman (London: Penguin Books).

Dynamics

SHOWS THE TRAINEES WORKING WITH THE EXTREMITIES OF SPACE, TIME AND THE BODY TO CREATE ENGAGING PERFORMANCE.

  • Barba, Eugenio. 1995. The Paper Canoe: A Guide to Theatre Anthropology (London: Routledge).
  • Fo, Dario. 1977. ‘Grammelot’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8A4n9Ez9O8g [accessed 6 June 2017].
  • Petit, Lenard. 2010. ‘The Dynamic Principles’, in The Michael Chekhov Handbook: For the Actor (London: Routledge), pp. 17–27.

Energy

DEPICTS TWO DIFFERENT APPROACHES. THE FIRST IS ABOUT EXPLORING OPPOSING QUALITIES OF TENSION IN THE BODY; THE SECOND USES A BREATHING SEQUENCE FROM CHI KUNG.

  • Barba, Eugenio. 1995. ‘Chapter 5: Energy, or Rather, The Thought’, in The Paper Canoe: A Guide to Theatre Anthropology (London: Routledge) pp. 50–80.
  • Oida, Yoshi, & Lorna Marshall. 1997. The Invisible Actor (Oxon & New York: Routledge).

Ethics

IS A CONVERSATION BETWEEN PAUL AND FRANK WHICH INTRODUCES SOME OF THE ETHICAL PRINCIPLES OF THE A-Z PROJECT, AS THEY RELATE TO TRAINING.

  • Camilleri, Frank. 2009. ‘Of Pounds of Flesh and Trojan Horses: Performer Training in the Twenty-first Century’, Performance Research, 14 (2): 26–34.
  • Grotowski, Jerzy. 1968. ‘American Encounter’, in Towards a Poor Theatre (London: Eyre Methuen) pp. 243–254.
  • Matthews, John. 2011. Training for Performance: A Meta-disciplinary Account (London: Methuen).
  • Suzuki, Tadashi. 1985. ‘House and Family’, in The Way of Acting (New York: Theatre Communications Group) pp. 25–46.

Eyes

PRESENTS SOME OF THE ROLES THE EYES CAN PLAY IN TRAINING AND PERFORMANCE, EXPLORING THE GAZE, EYE CONTACT AND THE OTHER SENSES.

  • Barba, Eugenio, & Nicola Savarese. 2006. ‘Face and Eyes’, in The Secret Art of the Performer: a Dictionary of Theatre Anthropology, sec. ed. (London: Routledge) pp. 122–139.

Face

INTRODUCES SOME SIMPLE EXERCISES TO WAKE UP AND STRETCH THE FACIAL MUSCLES.

  • Barba, Eugenio, & Nicola Savarese. 2006. ‘Face and Eyes’, in The Secret Art of the Performer: a Dictionary of Theatre Anthropology, sec. ed. (London: Routledge) pp. 122–139.

Feet

DEMONSTRATES BASIC WAYS OF MOVING AND SENSITIZING THE FEET IN FIRM CONTACT WITH THE FLOOR.

  • Allain, Paul. 1998. ‘Suzuki Training’, The Drama Review, 42, (1): 66–89 Films available.
  • https://vimeo.com/channels/tadashisuzuki [accessed 6 June 2017].
  • Barba, Eugenio, & Nicola Savarese. 2006. ‘Feet’, in The Secret Art of the Performer: a Dictionary of Theatre Anthropology, sec. ed. (London: Routledge) pp. 140–49.
  • Matthews, John. 2014. ‘Chapter 4: Foot’, in Anatomy of Performance Training (London: Methuen) pp. 53–76.
  • Suzuki, Tadashi. 1985. ‘Grammar of the Feet’, in The Way of Acting (New York: Theatre Communications Group) pp. 3–24.

Floorwork

EXPLORES POINTS OF CONTACT AND SHIFTING THE CENTRE WHILST SEATED AND WITH THE PELVIS RAISED.

  • Allain, Paul. 1998. ‘Suzuki Training’, The Drama Review, 42, (1): 66–89.
  • Wethal, Torgeir (director). 1972. ‘Part II Corporals’, in Training at the Teatr Laboratorium in Wrocław (Holstebro: Odin Teatret Films). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXJmTIRpCXs [accessed 6 June 2017].

Flow

USES A PARTNER BALANCE AND ROLL IN ORDER TO SHOW HOW TRAINEES CAN DEVELOP FLOW IN THEIR MOVEMENT. FLOW IN THIS EXERCISE REQUIRES COORDINATION OF BALANCE, BREATHING, RELEASE AND PRECISE CONTACT.

  • Camilleri, Frank. 2013. ‘Between Laboratory and Institution: Practice as Research in No Man’s Land’, TDR/The Drama Review, 57, 1 (T217): 152–66.
  • Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly. 2002. Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience(London: Rider).
  • Wethal, Torgeir (dir.). 1972. Physical Training (Holstebro: Odin Teatret Film) http://www.odinteatretarchives.com/odinstory/video-physical-training-1972 [accessed 6 June 2017].

Fundamentals

IS A PLAYFUL INTRODUCTION TO KEY ASPECTS WHICH TRAINEES SHOUD PAY ATTENTION TO AND CONSIDER BEFORE STARTING WORK.

  • See General above.

Grounding

EMPHASIZES THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING GROUNDED, CONNECTED THROUGH THE FEET TO THE FLOOR. GROUNDING ENABLES STABILITY AND BALANCE AND IS A USEFUL STARTING POINT FOR ALL ACTIONS AND MOVEMENT.

  • Allain, Paul. 1998. ‘Suzuki Training’, The Drama Review, 42, (1): 66–89. Films available: https://vimeo.com/channels/tadashisuzuki [accessed 6 June 2017].
  • Suzuki, Tadashi. 2002. ‘Culture is the Body’, in Phillip B. Zarrilli. (ed.) Acting (Re)Considered: a Theoretical and Practical Guide, sec. ed. (London: Routledge) pp. 163–167.
  • Suzuki, Tadashi. 1985. ‘Grammar of the Feet’, in The Way of Acting (New York: Theatre Communications Group) pp. 3–24.

Hands

SHOWS PLASTIQUES FOR THE HAND. THIS IS A SHORT SEQUENCE OF MOVEMENTS, BASED ON JERZY GROTOWSKI’S PRACTICE, THAT INCREASES MANUAL FLEXIBILITY AND STRENGTH.

  • Barba, Eugenio, & Nicola Savarese. 2006. ‘Hands’, in The Secret Art of the Performer: a Dictionary of Theatre Anthropology, sec. ed. (London: Routledge) pp. 150–162.
  • Grotowski, Jerzy. 1968. ‘Actor’s Training (1959–1962)’, ‘Actor’s Training: 1966’, in Towards a Poor Theatre (London: Eyre Methuen) pp. 133–174, and pp. 175–204.
  • Matthews, John. 2014. ‘Chapter 3: Hand’, in Anatomy of Performance Training (London: Methuen) pp. 33–52.

Images

SHOWS HOW THE TRAINEES CAN UTILIZE VISUAL IMAGES SUCH AS PAINTINGS AS A STARTING POINT TO DEVELOP AN INDIVIDUAL SCORE OF ACTIONS, POTENTIALLY LEADING TO CHARACTERIZATION AND THEN PERFORMANCE.

  • Carreri, Roberta. 2014. ‘Chapter 22: Judith’, in On Training and Performance: Traces of an Odin Teatret Actress(London: Routledge), pp. 110–17.
  • Tufnell, Miranda, & Chris Crickmay. 1993. Body Space Image: notes towards improvisation and performance (London: Dance Books).

Imagination

PLAYFULLY UNDERLINES THE IMPORTANCE OF USING THE IMAGINATION AS A KEY ASPECT OF THE CREATIVE PROCESS.

  • Petit, Lenard. 2010. The Michael Chekhov Handbook: For the Actor (London: Routledge).
  • Stanislavski, Konstantin. 2013. ‘Chapter 4: Imagination’, in An Actor Prepares, (London: Bloomsbury Academic) pp. 47–62.
  • Zinder, David G. 2002. BodyVoiceImagination: a Training for the Actor (New York: Routledge).

Improvisation

INTRODUCES THE IDEA OF IMPROVISING WITH EXERCISES OR ACTIONS (IN THIS CASE JUMPING) AS A MEANS TO BEGIN TO DEVELOP PERFORMANCE OUT OF TRAINING.

  • Callery, Dymphna. 2001. Through the Body: a Practical Guide to Physical Theatre (London: Nick Hern Books).
  • Johnstone, Keith. 1981. Impro: improvisation and the Theatre (London: Eyre Methuen Ltd).
  • Carreri, Roberta. 2014. ‘Chapter 16: Improvisation’, ‘Chapter 17: Individual improvisation’, and ‘Chapter 23: Notes on Improvisation’, in On Training and Performance: Traces of an Odin Teatret Actress (London: Routledge), pp. 78–82, pp. 83–87, and pp. 118–26.
  • Tufnell, Miranda, & Chris Crickmay. 1993. Body Space Image: notes towards improvisation and performance (London: Dance Books).
  • Zarrilli, Phillip B. 2009. ‘Chapter 6: Exercises for “playing” in-between: structured improvisations’, in Psychophysical Acting: An Intercultural Approach to Stanislavski (London: Routledge), pp. 99–114.

Impulse

SHOWS THE GROUP GIVE EACH OTHER IMPULSES THROUGH THE HANDS. IT SHOWS HOW RESISTANCE CAN STOP FLOW AND ALTER THE PARTNER’S RESPONSE. IT DEMONSTRATES DIFFERENT WAYS IN WHICH AN IMPULSE IN THE CENTRE CAN GENERATE FLUID MOVEMENT, UP FROM THE FLOOR AND THEN STANDING.

  • Carreri, Roberta. 2014. ‘Chapter 14: Being decided’, in On Training and Performance: Traces of an Odin Teatret Actress (London: Routledge), pp. 67–68.
  • Morris, Eilon. 2017. ‘Chapter 9. Jerzy Grotowski: Seeking Pulse, Movement and Rhythm’, in Rhythm in Acting and Performance(London: Bloomsbury), pp. 153–66.
  • Marshall, Lorna. 2008. ‘Chapter 2: Impulse and Response’, in The Body Speaks: Performance and Physical Expression (London: Methuen), pp. 33–54..
  • Richards, Thomas. 1995. At Work with Grotowski on Physical Actions (London & New York: Routledge).

Jumping

PRESENTS FOUR DIFFERENT TYPES OF JUMP: THE THIGH JUMP, VERTICAL JUMPS, RUNNING JUMPS AND THE BABY JUMP.

  • Allain, Paul (ed). 2012. Andrei Droznin’s physical actor training: A Russian masterclass, DVD & booklet. (London & Oxon: Routledge).
  • Droznin, Andrei. 2017. Physical Actor training: What Shall I do with the Body they Gave Me?, (Oxon & New York: Routledge).
  • Gordon, Mel. 2002. ‘Meyerhold’s Biomechanics’, in Phillip B. Zarrilli. (ed.) Acting (Re)Considered: a Theoretical and Practical Guide, sec. ed. (London: Routledge) pp. 106–128.

Kick

SHOWS HOW DIFFERENT WAYS OF KICKING CAN ENGAGE THE WHOLE BODY AND IMAGINATION. THIS IS SHOWN FIRST IN A RELEASED SWINGING MOVEMENT OF THE LEGS AND THEN IN A DEVELOPMENT OF EUGENIO BARBA’S ‘KICK TO THE CHEST’.

Landscaping

EXPLORES DIFFERENT WAYS OF WALKING WHICH PROGRESSIVELY INCORPORATE A RANGE OF IMAGINATIVE AND CREATIVE STIMULI. IT SHOWS HOW TECHNIQUE CAN HELP THE TRAINEE FINDS WAYS INTO PERFORMANCE ONCE THE IMAGINATION IS ENGAGED.

  • Carreri, Roberta. 2014. ‘Chapter 11: Sources on inspiration’, in On Training and Performance: Traces of an Odin Teatret Actress(London: Routledge), pp. 53–57.
  • Grotowski, Jerzy. 1968. ‘Actor’s Training (1959–1962)’, ‘Actor’s Training: 1966’, in Towards a Poor Theatre (London: Eyre Methuen) pp. 133–174, and pp. 175–204.
  • Stanislavski, Konstantin. 2013. ‘Chapter 4: Imagination’, in An Actor Prepares, (London: Bloomsbury Academic) pp. 47–62.

Layering

SHOWS THE TRAINERS DISCUSSING HOW PERFORMANCE CAN BE STRUCTURED THROUGH A PROCESS OF COMPILING LAYERS OF MATERIAL. THE FILM ITSELF MAKES A VISUAL REPRESENTATION OF THE TOPIC.

  • Bogart, Anne. 1995. Viewpoints (New York: Theatre Communications Group).
  • Bogart, Anne, & Tina Landau. 2005. Viewpoints: A Practical Guide to Viewpoints and Composition (New York: Theatre Communications Group).
  • Camilleri, Frank. 2017. ‘Inverting the Formula: Devising Through Adaptation’, New Theatre Quarterly, 33 (3): 240–53.
  • Carreri, Roberta. 2014. ‘Chapter 18: Composing a character’, in On Training and Performance: Traces of an Odin Teatret Actress(London: Routledge), pp. 88–92. .
  • Logie, Lea. 1995. ‘Developing a Physical Vocabulary for the Contemporary Actor’ New Theatre Quarterly, 11 (43): 230–240.

Movement

PRESENTS A SHORT CONVERSATION ABOUT HOW NOTIONS SUCH AS STILLNESS, DAILY AND HABITUAL MOTION, DRAMATURGY AND STRUCTURE CAN INFORM TRAINING AND PERFORMANCE.

  • Evans, Mark. 2009. Movement Training for the Modern Actor (London: Routledge).
  • Ewan, Vanessa, & Debbie Green. 2015. Actor Movement: Expression of the Physical Being : a Movement Handbook for Actors(London: Bloomsbury, Methuen Drama) Films available: https://vimeo.com/channels/actormovement/videos [accessed 6 June 2017]..
  • Lecoq, Jacques. 2006. Theatre of Movement and Gesture (London: Routledge).
  • Potter, Nicole. (ed.) 2002. Movement for Actors (New York: Allworth Press).
  • Snow, Jackie. 2012. Movement training for Actors (London: Methuen Drama).

Not Knowing

EXPLORES HOW THE TRAINEE (AND IN THIS CASE THE VIEWER) SHOULD NOT ANTICIPATE BUT BE OPEN TO ANY POSSIBILITY. AT THE SAME TIME, THE TRAINEE HAS TO KNOW PRECISELY WHAT THEY ARE DOING, BUT NOT WHAT IS COMING NEXT.

  • Grotowski, Jerzy. 1968. ‘Towards a Poor Theatre’, in Towards a Poor Theatre(London: Eyre Methuen) pp. 15–26.
  • Cynkutis, Zbigniew. 2015. Chapter 6: ‘Notes on Jerzy Grotowski’s ‘Tradition’, in Acting with Grotowski: theatre as a field for experiencing life. (London: Routledge) pp. 154–164.

Numbers

SHOWS THE TRAINEES DEVELOPING COORDINATION THROUGH A SYNCHRONIZED STEP AND CLAP RHYTHMICAL PATTERN IN A GROUP.

  • Camilleri, Frank. 2010. ‘Tekhnē Sessions: Investigating Dynamic Aliveness in the Actor’s Work’, Theatre, Dance and Performance Training, 1 (2): 157–71.
  • Goodridge, Janet. 1999. Rhythm and Timing of Movement in Performance (London: Jessica Kingsley).

Nurture

IS A CONVERSATION BETWEEN THE TRAINERS WHICH USES THE METAPHOR OF GROWING A PLANT TO ILLUSTRATE THE RELATIONSHIP OF TRAINER TO TRAINEE AND THE ETHICS THAT ARE INVOLVED.

  • Cynkutis, Zbigniew. 2015. Chapter 8: ‘The Second Studio of Wrocław’, in Acting with Grotowski: theatre as a field for experiencing life. (London: Routledge) pp. 202–216.
  • Suzuki, Tadashi. 1985. ‘House and Family’, ‘Human Experience and the Group’, in The Way of Acting (New York: Theatre Communications Group) pp. 25–46, pp. 47–68.

Objects

SHOWS HOW THIS ELEMENT CAN BE INCORPORATED INTO TRAINING. THE TRAINEES EXPLORE THEIR SELECTED ITEM AND EMBED IT IN MOVEMENT AND ACTION SCORES BEFORE DEVELOPING TEXTUAL SEQUENCES AS THEY BEGIN TO CREATE MONTAGED PERFORMANCE.

  • Carreri, Roberta. 2014. On Training and Performance: Traces of an Odin Teatret Actress (London: Routledge).

Openness

HIGHLIGHTS THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING AVAILABLE, RECEPTIVE AND WHOLLY PRESENT. THERE IS A FOCUS ON THE SPINE AND CHEST AS WAYS TO EXPERIENCE OPENNESS, WHICH CAN THEN BE HEARD IN THE VOICE.

  • Allain, Paul. 1997. ‘Chapter 5: Training’, in Gardzienice: Polish Theatre in Transition(Amsterdam: Overseas Publishers Association), pp. 59–78.
  • Feldenkrais, Moshe. 1991. Awareness Through Movement (London: HarperCollins.
  • McEvenue, Kelly. 2001. The Alexander Technique for Actors (London: Methuen.
  • Stanislavski, Konstantin. 2013. ‘Chapter 6: Relaxation of Muscles’, in An Actor Prepares, (London: Bloomsbury Academic) pp. 83–96.

Performance

FOLLOWS THE TRAINEES FROM EXPLORING A 10 MINUTE DEVISING TASK THROUGH TO PERFORMANCE, REFLECTION AND GROUP FEEDBACK.

  • Bogart, Anne. 2007. And Then, You Act: Making Arts in an Unpredictable World (London: Routledge).
  • Marshall, Lorna. 2008. The Body Speaks: Performance and Physical Expression (London: Methuen)..
  • Tufnell, Miranda, & Chris Crickmay. 1993. Body Space Image: notes towards improvisation and performance (London: Dance Books).

Push/Pull

DEMONSTRATES THE PRODUCTIVE TENSION OF OPPOSITION THAT IS PRESENT IN ALL MOVEMENT AND IS CORE TO THE ACT OF PERFORMING.

  • Lecoq, Jacques. 2006. Theatre of Movement and Gesture (London: Routledge).
  • Lecoq, Jacques. 2009. The Moving Body: Teaching Creative Theatre (London: Methuen Drama).
  • Kemp, Rick. 2012. ‘Exercise: Push and Pull’, in Embodied Acting (London: Routledge), pp. 79–81. See also the section on ‘Laban efforts as primary actions’ which includes push and pull, pp. 50–60.

Questioning

DRAWS ATTENTION TO THE VALUE OF SELF-REFLEXIVITY WITHIN TRAINING. IT SUGGESTS THAT CURIOSITY SHOULD FOLLOW PRACTICE.

  • See General above.

Release

SHOWS HOW LETTING GO OF TENSION IN THE BODY IS BENEFICIAL, WITH THE SPECIFIC EXAMPLE OF VOCAL RELEASE INCLUDING WITH A PARTNER. THIS ENABLES THE PERFORMER TO LIBERATE THE VOICE AND DISCOVER ITS FULL CREATIVE POTENTIAL.

  • Campo, Giuliano, with Zygmunt Molik. 2010. Zygmunt Molik’s Voice and Body Work (Oxon & New York: Routledge)..
  • Stanislavski, Konstantin. 2013. ‘Chapter 6: Relaxation of Muscles’, in An Actor Prepares, (London: Bloomsbury Academic) pp. 83–96.

Resonance

SHOWS HOW TO DEVELOP THE BODY’S CAPACITY TO RESONATE VOCALLY THROUGH PARTNER AND GROUP WORK. IT FOCUSES ON VIBRATION IN DIFFERENT CENTRES: THE HEAD, THE CHEST AND THE STOMACH AND BACK.

  • Campo, Giuliano, with Zygmunt Molik. 2010. Zygmunt Molik’s Voice and Body Work (Oxon & New York: Routledge)..
  • Grotowski, Jerzy, 1968. ‘Actor’s Training (1959–1962)’, ‘Actor’s Training: 1966’, in Towards a Poor Theatre (London: Eyre Methuen) pp. 133–174, and pp. 175–204.

Rhythm

SHOWS CLAPPING, BREATHING, VOICEWORK AND WALKING TO DEMONSTRATE THE SIGNIFICANCE OF RHYTHM IN TRAINING.

  • Allain, Paul. 1997. ‘Chapter 5: Training’, in Gardzienice: Polish Theatre in Transition(Amsterdam: Overseas Publishers Association), pp. 59–78.
  • Goodridge, Janet. 1999. Rhythm and Timing of Movement in Performance (London: Jessica Kingsley).
  • Morris, Eilon. 2017. Rhythm in Acting and Performance (London: Bloomsbury).

Space

EMPHASIZES THE IMPORTANCE OF PAYING ATTENTION TO SPACE AND HOW THE BODY BOTH MOVES THROUGH AND CREATES AND IS ITSELF IN AND OF SPACE.

  • Hodgson, John. 1997. Mastering movement: the life and work of Rudolf Laban. Methuen.
  • Newlove, Jean. 1993. Laban for Actors and Dancers (London: Nick Hern Books.
  • McCaw, Dick. (ed.) 2011. The Laban Sourcebook (Oxon & New York: Routledge).

Stillness

IS A MEDITATIVE FILM ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF FINDING STABILITY AND QUIETUDE. IT SHOWS THE TRAINEES IN THE ACT OF DOING NOTHING AS A KEY DYNAMIC WITHIN THE BROAD SPECTRUM OF PERFORMER TRAINING.

  • Allain, Paul. 1998. ‘Suzuki Training’, The Drama Review, 42, (1): 66–89. Films available: https://vimeo.com/channels/tadashisuzuki [accessed 6 June 2017].
  • Lampe, Eelke. 2001. ‘SITI – a Site of Stillness and Surprise: Ann [sic] Bogart’s Viewpoints Training meets Tadashi Suzuki’s Method of Actor Training’, in Ian Watson (ed.), Performer Training (London & New York: Routledge) pp. 171–190.
  • Zarrilli, Phillip B. 2003. ‘Chapter 15: “On the edge of a breath looking”: Cultivating the Actor’s bodymind through Asian martial/meditation arts’, in (ed.) Acting (Re)Considered: a Theoretical and Practical Guide, sec. ed. (London: Routledge) pp. 181–199.

Stretch

EXPLORES THE MECHANICS AND STRUCTURE OF A LEG STRETCH TO HIGHLIGHT THE KEY PRINCIPLES OF WHAT AN EXERCISE IS. LEG STRETCH TO HIGHLIGHT THE KEY PRINCIPLES OF WHAT AN EXERCISE IS FOR PHYSICAL ACTOR TRAINING.

  • Barba Eugenio. 2002. ‘An Amulet Made of Memory: The Significance of the Exercises in the Actor’s Dramaturgy’, in Phillip B. Zarrilli. (ed.) Acting (Re)Considered: a Theoretical and Practical Guide, sec. ed. (London: Routledge) pp. 99–105.
  • Hulton, Dorinda, & Maria Kapsali. 2015. Yoga and Actor Training, DVD with booklet (London: Routledge).

Technology

SHOWS HOW WE USED DIGITAL TOOLS WITHIN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE A-Z PROJECT. WE SEE STUDENTS WORKING WITH LIVE FEED, GO PRO CAMERAS AND ONSCREEN TEXT IN WHAT WE CALL THE ‘DIGITAL STUDIO’ AS WELL AS OTHER POST-PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES.

  • Allain, Paul, & Stacie Lee Bennett. 2018. ‘On Training’, Centenary Issue, Performance Research, 23:8..
  • Arts Archives http://www.arts-archives.org [accessed 6 June 2017].
  • Loukes, Rebecca. 2013. ‘Beyond the Psychophysical? The “Situated”, “Enactive” Bodymind in Performance’, in Phillip B. Zarrilli, Jerry Daboo, and Rebecca Loukes, Acting: Psychophysical Phenomenon and Process (Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan), pp. 224–55.
  • Siobhan Davies Replay https://www.siobhandaviesreplay.com [accessed 6 June 2017].
  • Wake, Caroline. 2018. ‘Two decades of digital pedagogies in the performing arts: a comparative survey of theatre, performance, and dance’, International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media, 14 (1): 52–69.
  • Camilleri, Frank. 2019. Performer Training Reconfigured: Post-Psychophysical Perspectives for the Twenty-First Century (London: Bloomsbury).

Text Work

SHOWS THE TRAINEES RECITING TEXTS THEN DEVELOPING THEM THROUGH MOVEMENT EXERCISES, INCLUDING ONE WITH THE CAMERA.

  • Callery, Dymphna. 2015. The Active Text: Unlocking Plays Through Physical Theatre (London: Nick Hern Books).
  • Berry, Cicely. 1987. The Actor and his Text (Virgin: London).

Us

IS A FILM IN WHICH THE VIEWER SEES HOW AN ENSEMBLE PLAY TOGETHER, USING WHO THEY ARE AS A STARTING POINT. THE FILM PRESENTS A VOCAL EXPLORATION OF NAMES TO DEMONSTRATE SOME ENSEMBLE PRINCIPLES, SUCH AS GROUP RHYTHM, PLAY, AND INDIVIDUAL PROPOSITIONS.

  • Allain, Paul. 1997. ‘Chapter 5: Training’, in Gardzienice: Polish Theatre in Transition(Amsterdam: Overseas Publishers Association), pp. 59–78.
  • Boddington, Ghislaine, & Christopher Bannerman. 2004. ‘Sharing the process: a consideration of inter-authorship in the performing arts’, Research in Mathematics Education, 15 (2): 76–80.
  • Britton, John. 2013. Encountering Ensemble. (London: Bloomsbury)..
  • Cynkutis, Zbigniew. 2015. Chapter 8: ‘The Second Studio of Wrocław’, in Acting with Grotowski: theatre as a field for experiencing life. (London: Routledge) pp. 202–216.
  • Lindh, Ingemar. 2013. Stepping Stones (Holstebro–Malta–Wrocław: Routledge Icarus).
  • Suzuki, Tadashi. 1985. ‘Human Experience and the Group’, in The Way of Acting (New York: Theatre Communications Group) pp. 47–68.

Voice

IS A FILM IN THREE PARTS: OVERVIEW, RELEASING SOUND AND FROM FACE TO TEXT. IT INCLUDES USING YOUR PARTNER TO RELEASE BREATH AND SOUND, WARMING UP THE FACE AND VOICE AND EXPLORING NONSENSE TEXTS.

  • Barker, Paul, & Maria Huesca. 2018. Composing for Voice: Exploring Voice, Language and Music sec. ed. (Oxon & New York: Routledge)..
  • Campo, Giuliano, with Zygmunt Molik. 2010. Zygmunt Molik’s Voice and Body Work (Oxon & New York: Routledge)..
  • Carreri, Roberta. 2014. ‘Chapter 24: The voice in training and in performance’, in On Training and Performance: Traces of an Odin Teatret Actress (London: Routledge), pp. 127–34.
  • Grotowski, Jerzy. 1968. ‘Actor’s Training (1959–1962)’ ‘Actor’s Training: 1966’, in Towards a Poor Theatre (London: Eyre Methuen) pp. 133–174, and pp. 175–204.
  • Linklater, Kristin. 2006. Freeing the Natural Voice: Imagery and Art in the Practice of Voice and Language (London: Nick Hern Books).
  • Rodenburg, Patsy. 2002. Finding Your Voice: A Step-by-Step Guide for Actors (London: Nick Hern Books).

Walking

LOOKS AT ONE WAY OF MOVING, ADAPTED FROM POLISH THEATRE GROUP GARDZIENICE THEATRE ASSOCIATION. IT INVOLVES RHYTHMICAL BREATHING AND STEPPING WITH A LOW CENTRE OF GRAVITY.

  • Allain, Paul. 1997. ‘Chapter 5: Training’, in Gardzienice: Polish Theatre in Transition(Amsterdam: Overseas Publishers Association), pp. 59–78.
  • Camilleri, Frank. 2013. ‘Habitational Action: Beyond Inner and Outer Action’, Theatre, Dance and Performance Training, 4 (1): 30–51.
  • Cynkutis, Zbigniew. 2015. ‘Chapter 5: Conversations with the Body’, in Acting with Grotowski: theatre as a field for experiencing life (London: Routledge) pp. 98–153.

Warm up

INTRODUCES AN APPROACH TO PREPARING THE BODY AND VOICE IN A SYSTEMATIC WAY.

  • Varley, Julia. 2011. ‘Chapter 3: Training’, inNotes from an Odin Actress: Stones of Water (London: Routledge), pp. 43–55.
  • Cynkutis, Zbigniew. 2015. ‘Chapter 5: Conversations with the Body’, in Acting with Grotowski: theatre as a field for experiencing life (London: Routledge) pp. 98–153.

X-Ray

ADDRESSES THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INNER AND OUTER ASPECTS OF THE PERFORMER.

  • Chamberlain, Franc. 2004. ‘Practical Exercises’, in Michael Chekhov(London: Routledge), pp. 113–44..
  • Todd, Mabel. 2008. The Thinking Body: a Study of the Balancing Forces of Dynamic Man(Gouldsboro, ME: Gestalt Journal Press, Inc.).

Ways to Play with the A-Z Terms

  • See General above.

X Exercise

SHOWS CONTRACTION AND EXPANSION. IT USES THE WHOLE BODY AS AN X WITH MOVEMENTS INTERSECTING AT THE CENTRE.

  • Carreri, Roberta. 2014. ‘Chapter 5: Exercises and principles’, in On Training and Performance: Traces of an Odin Teatret Actress(London: Routledge), pp. 26–28.

You

ASKS THE VIEWER WHO THEY ARE IN THE CONTEXT OF THEIR TRAINING IN RELATION TO THE A-Z. THE TEAM PRESENT PROVOCATIONS FROM THEIR EXPERIENCES, SOMETIMES GETTING IT WRONG!

  • Bogart, Anne. 2007. And Then, You Act: Making Arts in an Unpredictable World (London: Routledge).
  • Tufnell, Miranda & Chris Crickmay. 1993. Body Space Image: notes towards improvisation and performance (London: Dance Books).

Zoning Out

SHOWS AND DESCRIBES WHEN CONCENTRATION LAPSES AND THE PERFORMER SHIFTS TO AUTOPILOT. WE USE A SLOW WALK TO DEMONSTRATE THIS.

  • Carreri, Roberta. 2014. ‘Chapter 12: Dialogue with tiredness’, in On Training and Performance: Traces of an Odin Teatret Actress(London: Routledge), pp. 58–60.
  • Zarrilli, Phillip B. 2003. ‘Chapter 15: “On the edge of a breath looking”: Cultivating the Actor’s bodymind through Asian martial/meditation arts’, in (ed.) Acting (Re)Considered: a Theoretical and Practical Guide, sec. ed. (London: Routledge) pp. 181–199.
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