Creative Tasks

Creative Tasks

FILMS INCLUDED IN THIS SECTION: RESONANCE, TEXT WORK AND VOICE

You can begin by saying out loud a word which you like and listening to how it vibrates in the space in front of you as the sound leaves your mouth. Repeat the word a few times, trying to notice how it vibrates inside the body. Can you move this vibration around if you change the pitch of the word? In your head, in your jaw, in your chest… Then try this with a sentence or sequence of words – one of our favourites is Rubber Baby Buggy Bumper. What is your favourite in your language?

Then watch our film RESONANCE

This film shows how to develop the body’s capacity to resonate vocally through partner and group work. It focuses on vibration in different centres: the head, the chest, and the stomach and back.

Further reading:

Campo, Giuliano, with Zygmunt Molik. 2010. Zygmunt Molik’s Voice and Body Work (Oxon & New York: Routledge).

Grotowski, Jerzy, 1968. ‘Actor’s Training (1959–1962)’, ‘Actor’s Training: 1966’, in Towards a Poor Theatre (London: Eyre Methuen) pp. 133–174, and pp. 175–204.

Once your body is more resonant, leading to stronger vocal projection, you can then see how we worked with specific texts. Watch Text Work to think about what text you would like to use and to discover what kind of movements or exercises you can try in order to bring the text to life.

TEXT WORK

This film shows the trainees reciting texts then developing them through movement exercises, including one with the camera.

Further reading:

Callery, Dymphna. 2015. The Active Text: Unlocking Plays Through Physical Theatre (London: Nick Hern Books).

Berry, Cicely. 1987. The Actor and his Text (Virgin: London).

Finally, you can watch our film of more developed voice work, which should give you some ideas, whether you are working on a play text and want to discover some creative ways of exploring it, are devising a piece and want to create a soundscape, or whether you just want to learn more about vocal technique. The main thing is to enjoy yourself so that your body relaxes and the voice becomes freer.

Voice

This film is in three parts: overview, releasing sound and from face to text. It includes using your partner to release breath and sound, warming up the face and voice and exploring nonsense texts.

Further reading:

Barker, Paul, & Maria Huesca. 2018. Composing for Voice: Exploring Voice, Language and Music sec. ed.(Oxon & New York: Routledge).

Campo, Giuliano, with Zygmunt Molik. 2010. Zygmunt Molik’s Voice and Body Work (Oxon & New York: Routledge).

Carreri, Roberta. 2014. ‘Chapter 24: The voice in training and in performance’, in On Training and Performance: Traces of an Odin Teatret Actress (London: Routledge), pp. 127–34.

Grotowski, Jerzy. 1968. ‘Actor’s Training (1959–1962)’ ‘Actor’s Training: 1966’, in Towards a Poor Theatre (London: Eyre Methuen) pp. 133–174, and pp. 175–204.

Linklater, Kristin. 2006. Freeing the Natural Voice: Imagery and Art in the Practice of Voice and Language (London: Nick Hern Books).

Rodenburg, Patsy. 2002. Finding Your VoiceA Step-by-Step Guide for Actors (London: Nick Hern Books).

%d bloggers like this:
search previous next tag category expand menu location phone mail time cart zoom edit close